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Oklahoma Bombing Conspiracy Heats Up

 McVeigh and Nichols Didn't Act Alone, Claims Attorney



In what is shaping up to be one of the largest cover-ups in history, a U.S. District Judge has given a Salt Lake City attorney a green light to proceed in his quest to prove that the FBI is either hiding, or has destroyed, surveillance video associated with the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing-- video which may prove that Timothy McVeigh wasn't alone when he parked a truckload of explosives at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995.

On Monday, U.S. District Judge Clark Waddoups denied the government's motion to dismiss the case and ordered both sides to prepare for a bench trial. A status hearing has been scheduled for Nov. 21, at which time a trial date will be set.  At this hearing, Waddoups will decide whether the FBI adequately responded a Freedom of Information Act request for footage of Timothy McVeigh parking a Ryder truck at the Murrah Federal Building.  The request was filed by Jesse Trentadue, a Salt Lake City attorney who has spent the past five years trying to get hold of the surveillance video.

Trentadue began looking into the bombing after his brother died in a federal detention center in Oklahoma. He contends that federal agents mistook Kenneth Trentadue for a bombing suspect and beat him to death during an August 1995 interrogation. His official cause of death was listed as suicide.  Trentadue claims that the video will reveal a second bombing suspect who resembles, but is not, his brother.

Kenneth Trentadue


While the ruling was handed down last week, Trentadue's claims have caught the attention of several major news outlets recently such as Fox News, which showed official transcripts from the OKC bombing trial in which the FBI acknowledged that video footage shows a Ryder truck being driven by suspects (notice the plural).  The official narrative insists that McVeigh was alone when he parked the truckload of explosives, after plotting the attack with Terry Nichols and Michael and Lori Fortier.

In 1995, Timorth McVeigh claimed that Kenneth Trentadue was mistaken for Richard Lee Guthrie Jr., a suspected co-conspirator in the bombing who also died in federal custody.  Oddly, both Trentadue and Guthrie allegedly died from suicide by hanging, despite the fact that their bloodied bodies were covered with bruised.

In 2007, medical examiner Fred Jordan stated: I think it's very likely [Trentadue] was murdered. I'm not able to prove it....You see a body covered with blood, removed from the room as Mr. Trentadue was, soaked in blood, covered with bruises, and you try to gain access to the scene, and the government of the United States says no, you can't.... At that point we have no crime scene, so there are still questions about the death of Kenneth Trentadue that will never be answered because of the actions of the U.S. government. Whether those actions were intentional—whether they were incompetence, I don't know.... It was botched. Or, worse, it was planned.

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