Skip to main content

Bin Laden Raid Was Staged, Claims Award-Winning Journalist

The late Job W. Price


In late September, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Seymour Hersh raised eyebrows when he declared that the 2011 SEAL Team Six raid which killed Osama Bin Laden was “one big lie” and that “not one word” of the official narrative on what happened is true.

In Hersh's interview, which appeared in The Guardian, the journalist lashes out at American media for blindly accepting, and failing to raise questions, about the Obama administration's narrative about the raid which allegedly killed Bin Laden.   For example, the White House initially claimed that situation room photos showed President Obama watching the raid live-- even though there happened to be a blackout on the live feed.  In addition, residents who lived next to the compound have stated that they had never seen Bin Laden, adding that there was no evidence suggesting that he had ever lived there.

Unfortunately, Hersh missed a golden opportunity in his interview to drive home his point.  Although he stated that "Nothing's been done about that story, it's one big lie, not one word of it is true", he failed to point out one startling fact about SEAL Team Six-- the fact that numerous members of the mythical special forces group have been killed under bizarre circumstances in the weeks and months following the purported killing of Bin Laden.

In August 2011, the elite special forces unit suffered the heaviest losses in its history when a Taliban fighter shot down a Chinook helicopter carrying 22 Navy SEAL Team 6 members in Afghanistan.  Some have speculated that the government "tipped off" enemy fighters by disclosing highly-sensitive information, eventually leading them to shoot down the helicopter.
 
One of the members killed in the attack, Aaron Vaughn, feared that he and his family were about to become a "sacrificial lambs".  He told his mother, Karen Vaughn, to delete every reference to SEAL Team 6 from her Facebook and Twitter accounts.

On August 9 of this year, Jeffrey T. Kuhner of the Washington Times wrote:

SEAL-gate is potentially a bigger scandal than Benghazi, Libya. The administration — along with the top military brass — are desperately trying to cover up what took place on that fateful raid. Taliban guerrillas were waiting for the Chinook as it approached its landing site. Apparently, someone tipped them off that the SEALs were coming; the helicopter was attacked from three sides in a coordinated ambush. The U.S. military claimed that the Chinook was blown to pieces by a shoulder-fired missile, in which everyone on board was burned beyond recognition. Hence, senior military officials ordered the American bodies cremated without the prior approval of their family members.

Charles Strange, the father of SEAL member Michael Strange, who was also killed in the crash, stated that on at least three separate occasions his son grabbed him by the arm and announced that he had prepared his will.

On December 22, 2012, SEAL Team 4 Commanding Officer Job W. Price committed suicide. He was best known for finding and then killing Osama bin Laden.

To date, twenty-five SEAL team members who took part in the raid which purportedly killed Bin Laden have either committed suicide, died in freak accidents, or have been killed under mysterious circumstances.




Popular posts from this blog

The Hunt for the Osage River Monster

It's spring of 1844 in St. Clair County, Missouri. A mile or so from the banks of the muddy Osage River a pioneer settler named Matthew Arbuckle is plowing his field when he hears a banshee-like wail in the distance, coming from the direction of the river. Shrill and unearthly, the demonic howl fills the farmer with terror. Wasting no time, he unhitches his plow, jumps on the back of his horse and heads for the hills.

One hour later Arbuckle arrives in Papinville, a town fifteen miles from his farm. The exhausted horse is white with foam; its rider white with terror. In a gasping voice he tells of making an escape from an awful monster. Although he had not seen the beast, he had heard its voice, from which he could tell that it was a monster of immense proportions.

Those who heard Arbuckle's story were bewildered, and those who did not know the pioneer personally could tell, just by the bloodless pallor of his trembling skin, that the man was not telling a lie. Whatever terrify…

The Ticking Tombstone of Landenberg

If you look closely at a map of Pennsylvania, you'll see an anomalous semi-circular border at the extreme southeastern part of the state. This circle, known officially as the "Twelve Mile Circle", serves as the border between the Keystone State and Delaware. Much of the strange circle is surrounded by Chester County, one of the three original Pennsylvania counties created by William Penn in 1682. While there are many historical points of interest in Chester County, few are strange or as steeped in legend as the Ticking Tombstone.

Near the London Tract Meeting House in Landenberg is an old graveyard which contains a tombstone which is said to make eerie ticking noises, much like the ticking of a pocketwatch. Landenberg locals claim that the ticking is the result of two very famous surveyors who arrived in town during the 1760s- Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon.  A young child supposedly swallowed a valuable pocketwatch owned by Mason and later died, and the boy's head…

The Incest Capital of the World?

At the far eastern edge of Kentucky, nestled in Appalachia, resides Letcher County. In spite of its isolation and poverty (approximately 30% of the county's population lives below the poverty line), Letcher County has managed to grow at an impressive rate, from a population of just 9,172 in 1900 to a present-day population of nearly 25,000. However, even if Letcher County tripled or quadrupled its present population, there's still a pretty good chance that virtually all of the county's inhabitants would be related to each other-- thanks to one particularly fertile family whose astounding rate of reproduction can put even the friskiest rabbit to shame.

Around the year 1900, Letcher County was the home of a man by the name of Jason L. Webb, who made national headlines for having the one of the largest families in the world. According to newspaper reports of the era, Jason had 19 children, 175 grandchildren, and 100 great-grandchildren. Perhaps even more impressive was his b…