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Petition to Add Bigfoot to Endangered Species List Gains Momentum



In 2012, Peter Weimer implored the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to provide endangered species protection status to the creature known as Bigfoot. His request, however, was met with ridicule.

"This mythical animal does not exist in nature or otherwise," stated a Nov. 6, 2012 letter from DEC's Chief Wildlife Biologist Gordon R. Batcheller. The letter continued: "...the simple truth of the matter is that there is no such animal anywhere in the world. I am sorry to disappoint you."

The rejection was picked up by newspapers around the country and the story went viral, but even after nearly two years of public derision, Weimer hasn't abandoned his quest to see Bigfoot on the endangered species list. As of right now, Weimer's petition to the New York governor on Change.org to have Bigfoot added to the endangered species list has gained momentum; nearly half of the required signatures are already on the petition, which reads:

I respectfully request that a law be enacted including Sasquatch / Bigfoots on the New York State and National endangered species list.
 
From creating a Bigfoot convention three years ago as a special event to bring in tourism to Chautauqua County, New York. I have had sixteen eyewitnesses from Chautauqua County contact me resolving themselves in knowing they've seen a Bigfoot but are afraid to tell most anyone for fear of ridicule.  Five eyewitnesses from Cattaraugus County to our East and more then six eyewitnesses from Warren County, PA to our South.


The first documented sighting of a Bigfoot was in a newspaper article in Sackets Harbor, New York in 1818 of a large hairy wild man seen in the area. There are more then 100 documented sightings in New York State and more then 200 in Ohio as well as many other States including Hawaii...


I believe Bigfoots are as real as panthers, bear, and deer and are deserving of a endangered / protected species status because they are so rare and more then likely, part humanoid.


We feel it is important that New York State and the United States of America recognizes the danger these creatures are in and helps to do something about it.  Without our help to protect them, Sasquatch / Bigfoots will continue to be hunted versus living in peace and harmony as all other endangered species do today in the USA.


Is Peter Weimer sincere in his convictions about Bigfoot? Or is he just one more face in the ever-growing crowd looking to cash in on the cryptid craze by attempting to turn Chautauqua County into the Bigfoot Capital of the East?

The answer is, it doesn't really matter.

Bigfoot deserves to be on every state's endangered species list, even if there never was, or is, a creature known as Bigfoot. Such an action would not only protect a creature which may or may not exist, but it would be in the best interest of public safety. In 2012, for example, Spike TV offered a $10 million "bounty" for proof of the creatures existence. Do you think Spike TV would have paid out that sum to someone with grainy trailcam video footage or a blurry cellphone pic? Of course not. The "proof" is in the corpse.

In today's world, it's not too difficult to image an overzealous Bigfoot hunter roaming the wilderness with a shotgun, hellbent on shooting the first hairy creature he sees in the hopes of gaining fame and fortune. Thanks to mainstream media's recent fascination with cryptozoology in general and Bigfoot in particular, it's only a matter of time before the hunt for Bigfoot ends with tragic consequences. Wait and see-- it's bound to happen sooner or later.

So do the right thing and head over to Change.org to sign this petition. The life of some poor hermit covered in excessive body hair or a lost celebrity stumbling through the woods in a fur coat may depend on it!

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